Paul A. Benkert

Paul A. Benkert

SP4 Paul Anthony Benkert, USA, a field artillery radar crewmember of HHC, 519th MI BN, 525th MI group, was killed on January 7, 1967 in Hua Nghia Province, South Vietnam, when the military vehicle in which he was a passenger ran over a land mine.  He was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously.  Although initially from Saugerties, NY, he grew up in San Fernando Valley, CA, and enlisted in the army while in Washington State.  He is buried in St. Peter’s Cemetery in Kingston, NY.  His friend Mike Duffy wrote, “RIP, old friend.  We shared many adventures together.”
John P. Brady, Jr.

John P. Brady, Jr.

SP4 John Patrick Brady, Jr., USA, an armor crewman assigned to the 11th AR CAV RGT (Blackhorse), was killed on November 4, 1969 in Phuoc Long Province, South Vietnam.  He died at an aircraft-landing zone when the area came under attack by enemy forces.  He received the Purple Heart and Bronze Star (M) posthumously.  Raised in Kingston, NY where he had enlisted, Brady is buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery in Kingston, NY.  He is still remembered with great affection by his then girlfriend who has written, “I have been in love with you forever.”
Robert G. Bull, II

Robert G. Bull, II

CAPT Robert George Bull II, USAF, a tactical aircraft pilot for the 457th TAC ALFT SQD, 483rd TAC ALFT Wing, 7th AF, was killed on August 26, 1968 in Long Khanh Province, South Vietnam.  With over 100 combat sorties, he was on a re-supply mission when his C-7B Caribou cargo plane was hit by enemy fire, killing all 3 crewmen.  He was awarded the Purple Heart, Distinguished Flying Cross, and Air Medal posthumously.  Originally from Marlboro, NY, he is buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Maryland. A USAF veteran, Bill Gallenstein wrote, “A very proud cold war USAF veteran remembers you on this day. May God Bless you and your family always.”
Michael P. Carr

Michael P. Carr

BM3 Michael Peter Carr, USN, a boatswain’s mate on PBR-71, RIV DIV 54, TF 116, US NAVFOR V, was killed by a sniper during a patrol of the Long Tau River, in Gia Dinh Province, South Vietnam, on July 23, 1967.  He received the Purple Heart posthumously.  Originally from Hudson Falls, NY, he is buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery in Kingston, NY.  His niece Michelle Carr wrote lovingly, “I carry your name proudly, just like I know you carried yours proudly.”
Richard W. Crawford

Richard W. Crawford

LCPL Richard Wayne Crawford, USMC, a machine-gunner in I CO, 3rd RN, 5th Marines, 1st MAR DIV, III MAF, died during Operation Swift on September 6, 1967, from enemy fire in Quang Tri Province, South Vietnam.  He was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously.  He was raised in Wallkill, NY, attended Wallkill Central High School and is buried in Wallkill Valley Cemetery in Walden, NY.  His schoolmate Ish Martinez, who played ball with him, wrote, “How can you forget an old schoolmate who gave his life for his country?”
Walter J. Dart, Jr.

Walter J. Dart, Jr.

SSGT Walter Joseph Dart, Jr., USAF, of the 35th CBT, SPT Group, 35th TAC FTR Wing, 7th AF, who served at Phan Rang Air Base, died June 7, 1969 in Nihn Thuan Province, South Vietnam.  He was killed by enemy rocket fire and was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously.  From Kingston, NY, he was known to his friends as “Flea,” because he was so short.  He is buried in Montrepose Cemetery in Kingston, NY.  His friend Walter wrote, “You, friend, have never been forgotten, and never will be.  The old Phan Rang gang will see you soon.” 
Berton Decker

Berton Decker

SSGT Berton Decker, USA, a combat engineer in D CO, 19th Engineers, died on March 4, 1969 in Phu Yen Province, South Vietnam.  He was killed by a mine explosion on his last week of mine-sweep duty.  He received the Purple Heart and Good Conduct Medal posthumously.  Originally from Kerhonkson, NY, he enlisted on June 8, 1964.  He is buried in Pine Bush Cemetery in Kerhonkson.  His nephew John, who never got to meet him, wrote, “I know that you are a great guy, because you stayed, for a friend, and it cost you your life.  I love you, and wish I’d gotten to know you.”
Raymond J. Dilorenzo

Raymond J. Dilorenzo

1ST LT Raymond John Dilorenzo, USA, an engineer for the Engineer Construction Unit CMD, ADV Team 42, HQ, MACV, died February 7, 1970 in Binh Dinh Province, South Vietnam when the helicopter he was in experienced mechanical trouble and crashed, bursting into flames.  He was awarded the Purple Heart and Bronze Star (M) posthumously.  Originally from Milton, NY, he attended school in Highland, NY and is buried in North Edna Cemetery in Edna, Kansas.  Nearly 50 years later, his sister Katherine wrote, “To a kind, loving soul:  You died too young.”   
Peter M. Donovan

Peter M. Donovan

LCPL Peter Michael Donovan, USMC, a rifleman in D CO, 1st BN, 5th Marines, 1st MAR DIV, III MAF, died on August 31, 1968 in Quang Nam Province, South Vietnam, as a result of a gunshot wound sustained while on patrol.  He enlisted in 1963, from where he grew up in Kingston, NY.  He was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously, and is buried in Wiltwyck Cemetery, Kingston, NY. His good friend Clifford Tarr, who served with him wrote, “I’m trying to forget a lot, and with that goes the good, as well as the bad. I regret I was on R&R when he and other friends were killed.”
Carl F. Green

Carl F. Green

SP4 Carl Fred Green, USA, an infantryman in 1st PLT, A CO, 3rd BN, 21st INF, 196th INF BDE, Americal DIV, died on May 10, 1968 in Thua Thien Province, South Vietnam, from multiple wounds received during a firefight with enemy forces.  He received the Purple Heart posthumously.  He is buried in Graceland Cemetery, Racine, WI.  His friend Gary Lyles, who served with him wrote, “Despite being wounded that night, Carl elected to stay with the LP and was killed when the NVA tried to over-run our position.”
Harold S. Huggs

Harold S. Huggs

PFC Harold Sylvester Huggs, USA, an infantryman in D CO, 5th BN, 12th INF, 199th INF BDE, died June 27, 1969 in Long Khanh Province, South Vietnam, when the area was hit by enemy artillery bombardment.  He died from multiple fragmentation wounds and received the Purple Heart posthumously.  He was drafted while residing in Jamaica, Queens, NY.  His friend Joe wrote, “Only those of us who were there know what it is like to want to be anywhere else in the world but there.  Too many good people died.  You are still very much a hero.” 
Lewis P. Iorio

Lewis P. Iorio

SGT Lewis Patrick Iorio, USA, an infantryman of A CO, 1st BN, 52nd INF, 198th INF BD, Americal DIV was drafted in 1966 after graduating from Dutchess Community College.  He was initially reported missing, but was killed by small arms fire during a battle near Chu Lang in Quang Tin Province, South Vietnam.  He was subsequently awarded the Purple Heart.  He was raised in Highland, NY and is buried in St. Peter’s Cemetery in Poughkeepsie, NY.  His good school friend Alex Dutka wrote, “I want to thank you for what you did for your country and for what an impact it has made on my life.” 
Joseph C. Jeszeck

Joseph C. Jeszeck

MSGT Joseph Cobden Jeszeck, USAF, a navigator for the 17th Special Operations Wing, 7th AF, who was raised in Warwasing, NY, was killed when his AC-119G gunship experienced engine failure and crashed, killing 6 of the 8 men onboard.  The crash occurred in Gia Dinh Province, South Vietnam on April 28, 1970.  He was posthumously awarded the Air Medal and the Good Conduct Medal.  He was raised in Warwasing, NY.  Malcolm Kirby, a fellow USAF veteran wrote, “Rest in Peace, my Brother. You will not be forgotten.”
Charles W. Johnson

Charles W. Johnson

SSGT Charles William Johnson, USA, a 10-year serviceman attached to C CO, 1st BN, 26th INF, 1st INF DIV, USARV, was killed on January 12, 1967 in Binh Duong Province, South Vietnam, from multiple fragmentation wounds while on a combat mission.  He was awarded the Purple Heart, Bronze Star (M), and Good Conduct Medal posthumously.  Raised in Kingston, NY, he is buried in Montrepose Cemetery in Kingston.  In remembrance, Philip Madaio, his RTO, wrote, “Sarge, you will not be forgotten.  Once a Blue Spader, always a Blue Spader.  See you in base camp.”
Robert E. Johnson

Robert E. Johnson

CPL Robert Edward Johnson, USA, an infantryman in the First Airborne CAV, was killed on March 1, 1967 by an enemy hand grenade while on patrol in Binh Dinh Province, South Vietnam.  He received the Purple Heart and Bronze Star (M) posthumously.  Raised in Highland, NY, he was the first serviceman from Highland to die in Vietnam and is buried in Cedar Hill Cemetery in Middlehope, NY.  His friend Alex Dutka wrote, “I am very proud of him and another friend that gave their lives to save ours.  I am glad that the town has honored both of these friends by naming a park after him.”
Chester J. Joy

Chester J. Joy

CPL Chester Joseph Joy USMC, an anti-tank assaultman for FCO, 2nd BN, 26th Marines, 3rd MAR DIV, III MAF, died from enemy fire while engaged in Operation Hickory in Quang Tri Province in South Vietnam on May 16, 1967.  He received the Purple Heart posthumously.  Raised in Kingston, NY, “Buddy” was president of St. Joseph’s School Catholic Youth Organization and loved hunting and fishing.   He is buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery in Kingston, NY.  His friend Marc Adin remembered them catching fireflies when they were young boys and wrote, “My memory of you will always be bright.  You are not forgotten.  The fireflies remind me of you every summer.”
Paul Lewis

Paul Lewis

LCPL Paul Lewis, USMC, an anti-tank assaultman for K CO, 3rd BN, 27th Marines, 1st MAR DIV, III MAF, was killed on May 24, 1968 in Quang Nam Province, South Vietnam, from enemy fire while on an operation.  He was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously.  Raised in Saugerties, NY, he is buried in Mount Marion Cemetery.  His cousin Margaret Bailey wrote, “ The Traveling Wall visited us during Memorial Day this year, and I was privileged to find your name. I will not forget your sacrifice.”
Joseph L. Long

Joseph L. Long

PFC Joseph Leroy Long, USMC, enlisted into the Marines in 1964 and was assigned to B CO, 1st Engineer BN, 1st Marine DIV, 3rd Marine Amphibious Force.  He was killed on January 15, 1968 in Thua Thien Province, South Vietnam when he suffered lethal fragmentation wounds from enemy mortar fire.  He was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously.  Joseph is buried in Montrepose Cemetery in Kingston, NY.  His brother wrote, “You died before I really got to know you, but the family cares and blesses you for all you have done.  With all our love, Charlie.” 
Giuseppe Magri

Giuseppe Magri

1LT Giuseppe Magri, USA, an infantry unit commander of B CO, 3rd BN, 22nd INF, 25th INF DIV, USARV, was killed on January 16, 1969 by friendly fire, when forces engaged in Tay Ninh Province, South Vietnam.  He was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously.  Although initially buried on Staten Island, NY, his parents in Marlboro, NY relocated his remains to the family plot in Gardiner, NY.  A close friend, Michael Montie wrote, “I visited his parents after the war, and still visit with Joe twice a year at the Wall.  It’s our job to never forget friends like Joe.”
Richard Francis Maloy

Richard Francis Maloy

PFC Richard Francis Maloy, USA, field artilleryman at Q and SVC BTRY, 2nd BN, 33rd ART, 1st INF DIV, US ARV, enlisted November 1, 1962.  He died on April 13, 1966 in South Vietnam, a non-hostile ground casualty.  Raised in Ellenville, NY, he is buried in Fantinekill Cemetery in Ellenville, NY.  A fellow soldier wrote, “Rest in peace brave soldier, you have not been forgotten.”
Wayne C. Myers

Wayne C. Myers

CPL Wayne Chester Myers, USA, a radio operator for A CO, 13th SIG BN, 1st CAV DIV, USARV, died in Thua Thien Province on January 27, 1968 from gunshot wounds during an enemy ambush while on a liaison mission.  Originally from Saugerties, NY, he is buried in Montrepose Cemetery in Kingston, NY.  Garland Lingerfelt, who served with Myers wrote, “We were so young.  He was a good man and a good soldier just doing his job.  His death changed me, and all those who knew him.”
Michael T. Newell

Michael T. Newell

LT Michael Thomas Newell, USN, a pilot in VF-194, USS TICONDEROGA (CVW-19), Task Force 77, went MIA on December 14, 1966, when he was flying an F-8E Crusader aircraft over North Vietnam.  He crashed near the border between Nghe An and Thanh Hoa.  Newell was one of the first American casualties of Operation Rolling Thunder; his remains were recovered in 2006.  Originally from Ellenville, NY, he was Valedictorian of his high school class and graduated from the US Naval Academy.  He was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.  Donald Whitman wrote that Newell was his father’s wingman when a SAM missile hit his aircraft: “He died a brave man’s death, fighting to regain control of his damaged F8.”
Thomas C. Newkirk

Thomas C. Newkirk

PFC Thomas Clifton Newkirk, USA, an infantryman in C CO, 1st BN, 18th INF, 1st INF DIV, USARV, was killed by a gunshot wound sustained during enemy ground action on September 10, 1966 in Gia Dinh Province, South Vietnam.  He received the Purple Heart posthumously.  From Saugerties, NY, he is buried in Trinity Cemetery in Saugerties, NY. His childhood friend, Richard Passer wrote, “I have thought of you often, and now as an old man, even more so.  As kids growing up in Saugerties, and having you as one of my friends was the best time of my life.”
Alan P. Pagliaroni

Alan P. Pagliaroni

SP4 Alan Paul Pagliaroni, USA, an armor crewman for D CO, 2nd BN, 14th INF, 25th INF DIV, was killed by a gunshot wound during combat operations on May 3, 1968 in Hua Nghia Province, South Vietnam.  He was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously.   Although having spent time in Accord, where his father lived, he was an enlistee from Brentwood, NY, and is buried in Long Island National Cemetery. His mother Pauline Stein felt he never had the chance to live – that he thought war was a game he used to play as a child.  “He did not know what it was really like.”
William J. Partington

William J. Partington

LCPL William Jay Partington, USA, a combat engineer in B CO, 1st ENG BN, 1st MAR DIV, III MAF, was killed on March 2, 1970 in Quang Nam Province, South Vietnam.  He died from multiple wounds from a missile attack while on a mine sweep.  He was awarded the Purple Heart and Conspicuous Service Cross posthumously.  From Marlboro, NY, he was known for his skill at running track in high school.  He is buried at Cedar Hill Cemetery in Middlehope, NY.  His friend Joe Freeborn later wrote, “God speed, my brother; you have served well.  You gave the greatest gift of all.  Your life.”
Robert C. Peda

Robert C. Peda

1LT Robert Charles Peda, USA, served in the Navy before receiving an Army commission as a helicopter pilot for A Troop, 1st SQD, 9th CAV REG, 1st CAV DIV.  He died trying to rescue his gunner from the burning wreckage of his helicopter shot down on April 7, 1968 in Thua Thien Province, South Vietnam.  Posthumously he was awarded:  the Distinguished Service Cross, Air Medal and Purple Heart.  Raised in Kingston, NY, he is buried at Long Island National Cemetery.  Dave Hedman, who served with Peda, wrote, “He is still my hero today, and always will be.  I regret never writing his family to tell them how great a man he was.”
Richard F. Quinn

Richard F. Quinn

SGT Richard Floyd Quinn, USA, a medic in D CO, 1st BN, 8th CAV, 1st CAV DIV, was killed during a firefight on July 12, 1970 in Phuoc Long Province, South Vietnam as he attempted to save another medic.  Posthumously, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, Purple Heart and Bronze Star.  Drafted July 24, 1969, Quinn was trained at Fort Dix, NJ and Fort Sam Houston, TX.  Raised in Woodstock, NY, he attended Onteora High School and graduated from Ulster County Community College.  His younger brother George recalls Richard’s last words to him before being deployed:  “If I don’t come back, keep my name alive.” The only one from Woodstock to die in Vietnam, a street in the center of town was renamed “Sgt. Richard Quinn Drive” in his honor.
James R. Reilly

James R. Reilly

PFC James Richmond Reilly, USMC, a machine gunner in 2nd PLT, G CO, 2nd BN, Third Marines, Third Marine DIV, Fleet Marine Force, died March 17, 1966 in Quang Nam Province, South Vietnam.  For saving the life of a comrade by smothering a live grenade with his own body, he was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross and the Purple Heart.  From Esopus, NY, he is buried in Wiltwyck Cemetery in Kingston, NY.  Fellow serviceman Robert Jackson wrote, “His memory will never fade from his fellow Marine brothers.  You served your Corps and brothers well.”
Arvi Rohtvali

Arvi Rohtvali

W1 Arvi Rohtvali, USA, a warrant officer for the 240th A HC, 214th AVN BN, 12th AVN Group, 1st Aviation BDE, USARV, died in a helicopter crash caused by bad weather.  He enlisted April 28, 1968, and died June 25, 1968 in Bien Hoa Province, South Vietnam.  Posthumously he was awarded the Bronze Star (M) and the Air Medal.  Originally from Gardiner, NY, he is buried in Bruynswick Rural Cemetery in Wallkill, NY.  His sister-in-law Nora recalled how the family awaited his remains and the beautiful peaceful church.  She wrote, “May you rest in peace, Arvi.  Thank you for your sacrifice to keep us safe.”
James Rundle, Jr.

James Rundle, Jr.

CPL James Rundle, Jr., USA, an infantryman in B CO, 1st BN, 501st INF, 101 ST ABN DIV, USARV, was killed on June 7, 1969 in Quang Tin Province, South Vietnam from multiple fragmentation wounds sustained during a combat mission.  He was awarded the Silver Star, Bronze Star (M) and Purple Heart, posthumously.  He attended Kingston High School and enlisted in the Army on November 4, 1968.  He is buried in Wiltwyck Cemetery in Kingston, NY.  Paul Jacobson, who attended KHS with him, wrote:  “He was always a great friend.  He loved life, so it was shocking to hear of his fate.”
Michael P. Santoroski

Michael P. Santoroski

PFC Michael Paul Santoroski, USA, an infantryman from D CO, 2nd BN, 8th CAV, 1st CAV DIV, US Army, was killed in Binh Dinh Province, South Vietnam on November 26, 1967, the victim of an enemy booby trap.  He was awarded the Purple Heart and Bronze Star (M) posthumously.  Raised in Kingston, NY where he coached Jaycee Little League, Santoroski enlisted on March 9, 1967.  He is buried in St. Stanislaus Cemetery in Hazleton, PA.  Peter MacDonald, a Little Leaguer he once coached, later wrote:  “I will remember him forever as someone I looked up to.  He will be – in my mind – forever young.”
Henry G. Schulte

Henry G. Schulte

CPL Henry Gerard Schulte, USA, of B CO, 2nd BN, 60th INF REG, 9th INF DIV, enlisted on May 21, 1968, and died in Long An Province, South Vietnam on February 1, 1969.  He died from wounds received during a firefight while on a combat operation.  Posthumously, he was awarded the Silver Star, Purple Heart, and Bronze Star (M).  He attended New Paltz High School, where his friends remembered how he loved to draw.  He is buried at St. Charles Cemetery in Gardiner, NY.  Garnet Jenkins, the sister of another serviceman who also made the supreme sacrifice, wrote quoting from the Bible:  “Greater love hath no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.”
John J. Senor

John J. Senor

PFC John Joseph Senor, USA, an infantryman with C CO, 2nd BN, 9th INF DIV, died on February 2, 1969 in Dinh Tuong Province, South Vietnam.  Sustaining injuries during a combat operation, he was taken to a military hospital where he later died of his wounds.  He received the Purple Heart, Bronze Star (V), and Bronze Star (M) posthumously.  Having grown up in Kingston, NY, he is buried in St. Peter’s Cemetery in Kingston, NY.  His childhood friend Bob Baltz wrote, “I was the lucky one who made it home, but you are the true hero.”
Stephen A. Sherlock

Stephen A. Sherlock

PFC Stephen Andrew Sherlock, USA, a field artilleryman in B BTRY, 5th BN, 27th Artillery, I Field Force, USARV, was killed on April 2, 1969 in Binh Thuan Province, South Vietnam from an enemy mine detonation.  From Kingston, NY, Sherlock is buried in Montrepose Cemetery in Kingston.  His brother John Sherlock wrote, “I will never forget coming home one afternoon and the sight of a military car in front of our home.  Steve had a heart of gold and our government killed him and thousands like him in a misguided conflict. RIP, my brother.”
Harry J. Sickler

Harry J. Sickler

SP4 Harry Joseph Sickler, USA, a helicopter repairman for the 573rd Trans. Det., 118th AHC, 145th AVN BN, MACV, stationed at Bien Hoa Air Base, South Vietnam, was killed by enemy mortar fire at the airbase on November 1, 1964.  He was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously.  He grew up in Lanesville, NY and attended the Hunter-Tannersville Central School.  He is buried in the Shandaken Rural Cemetery.  A street in Hunter, “Harry Sickler Way,” is named in his honor.  His boyhood friend Matthew Neeson wrote, “We proudly served our country and you gave it all.  I only gave some.  May your family find peace and comfort in your memory, and may their sorrow abate with time.”
William F. Steiger

William F. Steiger

SSGT William Fredrick Steiger, USA, who enlisted on July 8, 1946, was an infantryman in C CO, 2nd BN, 2nd INF, 1st INF DIV.  He died on December 3, 1966 in South Vietnam by from shrapnel wounds sustained during enemy ground action.  He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart and Bronze Star (M).  Raised in Saugerties, NY, he is buried at the Mt. View Cemetery in Saugerties. Garnet Jenkins, whose brother had also died in Vietnam wrote, “In Remembrance of your sacrifice and with a multitude of thanks for your courage and your years of service and dedication to our country and for freedom, rest in peace.”
Wallace F. Thibodeau

Wallace F. Thibodeau

SSGT Wallace Fred Thibodeau, USA, an intelligence specialist for K CO, 75th INF, RGT (Rangers), 4th INF DIV, USARV, was killed by small arms fire on July 19, 1969 in Binh Dinh Province.  He received the Silver Star, the Purple Heart and the Air Medal posthumously.  He was raised in Garden Grove, CA, but later resided in Kingston, NY, where he enlisted on June 22, 1966.  He is buried in Westminster Memorial Park in Westminster, CA.  His sister Renee wrote, “Our children and their children know you and love you through our memories.  I am proud, but would rather have you here.”
Robert W. Tubby

Robert W. Tubby

PFC Robert William Tubby, USA, a food service specialist for the 329th Trans CO, 159th Trans BN, 4th Trans CMD, 1st Log CMD, USARV, died August 6, 1967 in Phuoc Tuy Province, South Vietnam.  His death was the result of an accidental drowning after falling from a gangplank between a boat and the pier.  Originally from Kingston, NY, where he had enlisted on December 8, 1966, Tubby is buried at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Kingston, NY.  His nephew wrote, “Uncle Bobby, I was very young when you passed, but you will never be forgotten.  Carry on, Marine!”
Jose G. Viruet

Jose G. Viruet

PFC Jose Galeno Viruet, USMC, assigned to MP CO, HQ BN, 1 MAR DIV, was killed when the jeep he was in hit a mine on January 31, 1968 in Quang Nam Province, South Vietnam.  He was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously.  Initially from Wallkill, NY, he is buried in Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, NY. His grandniece Elizabeth wrote, “Your selflessness and drive to serve our country is beyond admirable. We are blessed to have such traits in our family. Your memory lives on, and your sacrifices will not be in vain.”
Michael J. Winters

Michael J. Winters

SGT Michael John Winters, USA, enlisted on January 8, 1968 serving in A BTRY, 1st BN, 27th ARTY, 23rd ARTY Group, II Field Force, USARV.  He died on April 22, 1969 in Tay Ninh Province, South Vietnam, when a vehicle he was in was hit by an RPG.  He received the Purple Heart and Bronze Star (M) posthumously.  Raised in Saugerties, NY, he is buried at St. Mary’s of the Snow Cemetery in Saugerties.  A member of his gun crew wrote:  “I was also there the night of April 19, 1969, and the memory of what happened will be with me always.  Thank you for your sacrifice.  May God Bless You! ”
Raymond C. Wood

Raymond C. Wood

PFC Raymond Charles Wood, USMC, a rifleman for M CO, 3rd MAR DIV, 3rd BN, 3rd Marines, enlisted on September 12, 1968, and died May 17, 1969 in Quang Tri Province, South Vietnam, from enemy artillery fire.  He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart.  Wood grew up in Napanoch, NY, and is buried in the Bloomingburg Cemetery in Bloomingburg, NY.  His friend, the Rev. Charles Morgan later wrote, “Thanks for the friendship so long ago, and even more for your sacrifice.”
Robert F. Woodhouse, Jr.

Robert F. Woodhouse, Jr.

CAPT. Robert F. Woodhouse, Jr., USA, of ADV Team 1, HQ, MACV Advisors, MAC, died on July 7, 1970 in Thua Thien Province, South Vietnam.  He was killed when enemy fire struck the helicopter he was in.  Wounded in the crash, he later died of his wounds at a medical facility.  He was awarded the Silver Star, Purple Heart, and Bronze Star (M) posthumously.  Originally from Ellenville, NY, he is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in Elmira, NY.  A friend in his Company recently wrote, “Even though it has been 47 years, he is still in our hearts.”